IU Bloomington Academic Policies

H. Instructional Responsibilities

Undergraduate Admissions Policy

BL-ACA-H11

Scope

All applicants beginning with those who apply to matriculate at Indiana University, either as first-time students or as external or inter-campus transfer students, for the summer and fall of 2018.

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Policy Statement

Academic Preparation
Indiana University Bloomington has adopted the following standards for academic preparation to ensure that its undergraduate students are properly prepared for college work.

All persons applying for admission to baccalaureate programs shouldi complete, before they matriculate, at least thirty-four (34) credits of college-preparatory courses, advanced placement courses, and/or college courses (note: the phrase "one credit" means a one-semester course, such as a one-semester course in high school, a three credit-hour college semester course, or a four credit-hour college quarter course), including:

  1. eight credits of English, of which one credit may be speech and one credit may be journalism;
  2. seven credits of mathematics, including (i) four credits of algebra and two credits of geometry or an equivalent six credits of integrated algebra and geometry, and (ii) one credit of precalculus, trigonometry, or calculus ii;
  3. six credits of social science including two credits of U.S. history, two credits of world history/civilization/geography, and two additional credits in government, economics, sociology, history, or similar topics;
  4. six credits of sciences, including at least four credits of laboratory sciences - biology, chemistry, physics;
  5. four credits of world languagesiii; and
  6. three or more credits of additional college-preparatory courses: trigonometry and additional mathematics credits are recommended for students intending to pursue a science degree; additional world language credits are recommended for all students.

If a student's high school does not offer the courses needed to meet one or more of these course requirements, then alternative college-preparatory courses may be substituted for those courses that are not available.

If the requirements of a student's high school diploma preclude satisfying these course requirements, then alternative college-preparatory courses may be substituted where necessary, but the student should satisfy as many of these requirements as possible.

Indiana residents must have completed or, if still in high school, must be on track to complete a Core 40 curriculum or equivalent or a Core 40 Academic Honors curriculum or equivalent as a condition to be offered regular admission. Indiana residents must complete a Core 40 curriculum or equivalent or a Core 40 Academic Honors curriculum or equivalent before matriculating.iv A Core 40 Academic Honors curriculum that includes precalculus, trigonometry, or calculus will satisfy all of the course requirements above. Indiana residents who were residents of other states while attending high school for one or more terms may request appropriate exceptions.iv

Some of the Schools and academic programs at Indiana University Bloomington may require additional or equivalent coursework for direct admission.

Academic Achievements, Abilities, Motivation, and Maturity v
Academic success at the college level depends upon a range of factors in addition to academic preparation including: academic achievement; verbal, quantitative, and reasoning abilities; academic motivation, work, and persistence; and academic maturity.

Academic achievement can be demonstrated by grades and grade trends in college-preparatory coursework, class rank, and scores on standardized subject exams.v Preference will be given to applicants who have a grade point average greater than a 3.0 on a 4-point scale in their college-preparatory courses.

An applicant must submit scores on a nationally standardized college admissions exam (SAT or ACT).vi Preference will be given to Indiana residents who score above the state average and to non-residents who score above the national average.

Essays; honors, dual-credit, Advance Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate, and/or Advanced College Project (ACP) courses; extra-curricular activities; letters of recommendation; community service; and work experience may also be considered as evidence of academic motivation and maturity.

First-time Undergraduate Students
Applicants for admission as first-time undergraduate students must have followed or be following a program of study that will meet the standards described within Academic Preparation in order to be admitted and should be evaluated according to the criteria specified in Academic Achievements, Abilities, Motivation, and Maturity.

An admission decision may also take account of the known strengths and weaknesses of an applicant's college preparation program and of the trend of an applicant's grades in college-preparatory courses.

An admission decision may also take account of an applicant's potential contribution to a diverse educational environment as one factor in an individualized holistic evaluation for admission.

U.S. residents who are not home-schooled should, under normal and ordinary circumstances, complete a high school diploma.

For applicants who are at least twenty-one years old, have been out of high school three or more years, or did not graduate from a high school, admission can be based also on factors such as a high school equivalency exam, including the Indiana test assessing high school completion (TASC), the General Educational Development (GED) diploma, or the HiSET Program, maturity, work experience, and military service, as determined by the campus and by the schools and academic programs to which they apply. Applicants who are at least twenty-one years old or have been out of high school three or more years may be admitted without scores on nationally standardized exams.v

Applicants who were home-schooled must have followed or be following a program of study that will meet the standards described within Academic Preparation in order to be admitted and should be evaluated according to the criteria specified within Academic Achievements, Abilities, Motivation, and Maturity.

The campus may, at its discretion, admit a student on a probationary or conditional basis and/or through faculty sponsorship.

Scholarship and outreach programs may, independent of the admissions process, take into account factors not mentioned here.

External Transfer Students
Applicants who are classified as a transfer students according to the Indiana University definitionvii but have not attended any campus of Indiana University must have satisfied the course requirements described within Academic Preparation either in high school or in their prior college studies, and must satisfy the following requirements:

  1. Applicants must submit official transcripts from all institutions previously attended and demonstrate a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.3 on a 4-point scale for Indiana residents and at least 2.5 on a 4-point scale for non-residents. For applicants who have not attended a community college, college, or university within the past three years, admission can be based also on factors such as a high school equivalency exam, including the Indiana test assessing high school competency (TASC), the General Educational Development (GED) diploma, or the HiSET Program, maturity, work experience, and military service, as determined by the campus and by the schools and academic programs to which they apply.
  2. Applicants who have fewer than 26 transferable semester hours should also satisfy the guidelines specified within Academic Achievements, Abilities, Motivation, and Maturity.

Some schools and academic programs at Indiana University Bloomington may have higher standards and specific requirements in addition to those mentioned here.

The campus may, at its discretion, admit a student on a probationary or conditional basis and/or through faculty sponsorship.

Non-Admitted Applicants
Applicants who are not admitted should be advised of what steps to take in order to be reconsidered at a later date.

Implementation and Accountability

  1. This policy shall go into effect beginning with applicants who apply to matriculate at Indiana University, either as first-time students or as external or inter-campus transfer students, for the summer and fall of 2018.
  2. The Office of Admissions will, as soon as is reasonable, begin encouraging prospective students to meet the course requirements described within Academic Preparation and begin applying the criteria specified within Academic Achievements, Abilities, Motivation, and Maturity.
  3. The President and the Provost of Indiana University Bloomington shall be held responsible for the admission procedures followed on the campus, for insuring compliance with the goals and guidelines herein set forth, and for achieving satisfactory levels of student academic quality and success. They shall consult with the Bloomington Faculty Council if adjustments are needed. They may approve exceptions for a few individuals from time to time. If a need for a policy exception should arise, then that matter must be brought back to the Bloomington Faculty Council for consideration and approval.
  4. This policy shall be reviewed by the Educational Policies Committee of the Bloomington Faculty Council every three years, or as needed in response to changes in the curriculum defining requirements for high school graduation in Indiana.

i Wherever the word “should” appears in this policy, it means that an applicant is required to satisfy the specified conditions unless there are extraordinary circumstances which prevent it; in most instances, the policy describes such circumstances and set forth alternative conditions. Wherever the word “must” is used, there are no exceptions.

ii The alternatives of discrete mathematics and probability/statistics are specifically excluded here. Precalculus and trigonometry are high school courses that are remedial and do not count for credit toward baccalaureate degrees on the Bloomington campus. Precalculus and trigonometry are the foundation for college-level mathematics courses. The calculus courses offered in Indiana high schools are dual-credit or advanced placement courses, so they afford the opportunity to earn college credit.

iii The phrase “world languages” here encompasses non-English, ancient and modern languages that were or are both spoken and written. It also includes sign language. It does not include computer programming language.

iv Section 20-40-4-2 of the Indiana Code, current as of the 2016 regular session, require that a student who is an Indiana resident must have completed either (1) the Core 40 curriculum established under IC 20-30-10, or (2) a curriculum that is equivalent to the Core 40 curriculum, as a general requirement for regular admission as a freshman to a state educational institution.

v There is a distinction between “maturity” and “academic maturity”. The former is a matter of age and personality, which may serve as a basis for an exception to the normal requirements for admission; this exception is normally relevant only to non-traditional students. The latter is a matter of academic preparation and intellectual development, which is the sense employed in the section of the policy addressing Academic Achievements, Abilities, Motivation, and Maturity as one of the positive factors for granting admission.

vi Examples of standardized subject exams are the Core 40 subject exams, the College Board's subject/achievement exams, and the ACT's subject exams. The SAT and ACT exams measure certain types of academic ability. In spite of their limitations, these exams are nationally accepted measures.

vii Indiana University defines a transfer student as an individual who, at the time of application, has completed, or is on track to complete, 12 college-level, non-remedial credit hours from a regionally accredited institution after high school graduation.

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Reason for Policy

Indiana University is committed to the goals of quality, diversityviii, and access in its admissions policies. The University will strive to have an undergraduate student body whose members are well-qualified for the University's courses and programs and who represent the full range of diversity within our state, nation, and world.

Indiana University will base its admission decisions on the academic quality of the applicants; no one will be denied admission on grounds of sex, age, race, religion, ethnic origin, veteran status, disability, and/or sexual orientation. In its admission policies, Indiana University supports and complies with Affirmative Action regulations.

Indiana University will base its admission decisions on an overall evaluation of applicants' merits, strengths, and weaknesses. An applicant should demonstrate a combination of academic preparation, achievements, abilities, motivation, and maturity that promises success in Indiana University's academic programs. Indiana University does not use a rigid set of rules. Admission to the University is at the discretion of the University.

viii Diversity is recognized as a central component of the academic mission at Indiana University Bloomington as expressed in the Bloomington Faculty Council statement on diversity (http://www.indiana.edu/~bfc/resolutions-statements/diversity.html)

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History

Approved: BFC 2/21/2006.

The title of this policy was changed from “Undergraduate Admissions Policy for Fall 2011” when the policy was moved into the updated database in 2016.

Amended and approved: BFC 3/21/17

Previous versions of the policy:

02/21/2006 - 03/21/2017

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